HYUN HAN
2 min readFeb 11, 2021

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It is not a simple exaggeration to say people pursue intelligence as a basic element that differentiates them from mere animals. The ability to think and learn must have brought our humans to this glorious position for now. Problem solving and productivity have been stressed enough by thinkers and executives to stop their bushiness from falling into a plateau in growth, which can be considered as a potential hint of their death. However, this point needs a different angle of a strategy to shed a light on; one exponentially successful can outperform the other multiple negatives. For instance in the stock market, a trader made a fortune by not selling any of his stocks, but by keeping buying stocks of companies he thinks valuable. As he is not a mystical fortuneteller, some of the companies he invested in got delisted to incur a somewhat painful loss, though one or a couple of companies make an exponential hit to compensate and exceed every loss made by the other. That is, this seemingly absurd betting actually results from braveness to admit what was once right may now be wrong. As we grow up, experiences through our lives cannot but form conceptions to react relatively faster next time to the repetitive situations happened before in particular. It can look slow a bit to disappoint our intuitive partners, but it is the time to rethink and unlearn to seize an extraordinary opportunity hidden in this turbulent world we live in with no high possibility of accurate predictions. The cognitive laziness makes us stick to our current thinking mechanisms and hesitate to question ourselves once more, so we can alleviate the level of fear in the unknown. In the end, a question is upon us; what kind of improvisation do you want to demonstrate to overwrite well-learned responses?

From reading a paragraph in P.02 (10/Feb/2021)

— Think Again by Adam Grant

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HYUN HAN
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Working on: Indistractable; Randomness; Priming; Invincible; Flow